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ACT Form 74C English Answer Explanations

Explain to me:

 

 

 


A.

B, C, D are all redundant.

When all of the answer choices are grammatically acceptable and express the same essential information, the shortest option will usually be correct. In fact, you should always check the shortest answer first and only look at the longer options if the shortest one is clearly incorrect.

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G.

G offers the most vivid description of iguanas’ movement on the floor of a rain forest.

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C.

B and D are grammatically incorrect; of A and C, C is more concise.

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G.

The underlined should be kept because it emphasizes the narrator’s feelings which are important to the development of the passage.

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5. Given that all the choices are accurate, which one provides the most precise description of the pattern of spikes on the iguana’s spine?
A. NO CHANGE
B. I saw spikes that looked like they were just beginning to develop,
C. There were small spikes on its armored back,
D. Rows of budding spikes lined its spine,

D.

A, B and D say nothing of how the spikes are arranged, and are very long; D does and is very short, that is, D is ‘precise’.

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G.

The portion after the underlined portion is the second part of the compound verbs. The clause must be constructed to the effect of “the woman [did something] and watched it peacefully rest.” Thus F and G are incorrect. J is also incorrect because what “the woman showed” is not “it” (the iguana), but the tenderness.

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B.

The narrator thought the woman is pitiful for showing so much love for her unfeeling pet.

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J.

Prepositions are location and time words such as of, for, from, to, in, with, by, before, and after.

For the ACT, the most important thing to know about prepositions is that commas should not be used before or after them.

The comma should not be used after or before “from”.

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B.

The other choices (regard, scrutinize, appraise and consider) all have the meaning of “to look at; observe”.

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F.

The gerund “delivering a verdict” modifies the noun “judge” immediately before it. The other choices are wordy and wrong.

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D.

This sentence contains the compound object “my cat and me”. A comma should never be placed between the items in a compound subject. (p68, Meltzer)

“Which” always comes after a comma and sets off a non-essential clause, whereas “that” never comes after a comma and sets off an essential clause. (p148, Meltzer)

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F.

The gerund “looking as content as a kitten” modifies the object “the iguana”.

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B.

It is natural to place the sentence at Point B because this is where the woman told the narrator the iguanas is just a baby.

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F.

F is correct as it accurately summarizes the passage.

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A.

That Billy Mills qualified for the Olympics and that he was a long shot are opposing ideas. Thus, they should be connected by a comma and a contradictor ‘but’.

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F.

Prepositions are location and time words such as of, for, from, to, in, with, by, before, and after. For the ACT, the most important thing to know about prepositions is that commas should not be used before or after them. Therefore G and H are wrong. There should not be a comma in “Olympic gold medal” either.

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C.

“Lagged” indicates that the Billy Mills’ time is longer than that of Ron Clarke. Thus ‘behind’ should be used. Also, “lag behind” is a commonly used phrase.

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G.

Sentence [3] should be placed immediately after sentence [1] because both sentences talk about the runner’s qualification for the Olympics.

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A.

Oglala Lakota: The Oglala Lakota or Oglala Sioux(pronounced [oɡəˈlala], meaning “to scatter one’s own” in Lakota language[5]) are one of the seven subtribes of the Lakota peoplewho, along with the Dakota, make up the Great Sioux Nation. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oglala_Lakota )

An Oglala Lakota is an non-essential clause, an appositive, to be more exact. Therefore two commas should be placed around it. (See p29, 50, Meltzer.)

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H.

Only H. makes the transition from Mills’ ambition to be a boxer to his career as a runner which is the main topic of the passage.

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C.

The clause “while still in the Marines” indicates that the subject of the sentence should be a person, i.e. ‘he’.

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H.

The topic of the essay’s opening paragraph is the 1964 Olympics.

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A.

 “Rather unknown” means that Mills was not “completely unknown”.

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H.

‘Undeterred’ means ‘not discouraged from proceeding’.

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J.

F. is wrong because Mohamed Gammoudi and Ron Clarke wre not “overseers”, but runners. “Leaders” in this context mean leading runners in the race, not “rulers” or “authorities”, eliminating G. and H.


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J.

F. is wrong because Mohamed Gammoudi and Ron Clarke wre not “overseers”, but runners. “Leaders” in this context mean leading runners in the race, not “rulers” or “authorities”, eliminating G. and H.

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D.

Either two commas or no commas should be used, eliminating B and C. Grammatically, B and C are both correct. But since the fact that “Mills had been in third place” is important and should be emphasized, no commas should be used. (See p55, Meltzer.)

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F.

The past participle of “run” is “run”.

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C.

The opening sentence already says Mills won the race. The information in the underlined portion of the sentence is redundant.

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H.

The two complete sentences can only be separated either by 1) period, 2) semicolon, or 3) comma + coordinating conjunction. (See p37, Meltzer.)

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D.

For A. to work, the subject of the sentence must be a person. B is unnecessarily wordy. The contradictor in D is unnecessary too.

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F.

If “sweeping silent movies off the screen” isn’t the most “swift” and “dramatic” among the choices, tell me what is.

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C.

“Whom” should not be used before a verb. (See p149, Meltzer.)

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H.

After ‘figured out that’, a sentence should follow. Only F. makes a sentence.

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C.

The question tests easily confused words. “Allusion” means “a casual reference”; “elusion” means “the act of eluding or escaping”; “illusion” means “something that deceives by producing a false or misleading impression of reality”.

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J.

Only J. makes a complete sentence.

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D.

The underlined portion repeats information already said in the passage.

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F.

The subject of the sentence is the singular noun “the need”, therefore the verb in the 3rd person singular form should be used, eliminating J. Since the rest of the paragraph is in the present tense, the verb should be in agreement with this, eliminating G. “Arise from” is a commonly used phrase.

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D.

The “Foley artist” works with sounds in movies; A sound technician works with sounds in movies too. Deleting the underlined portion may increase the chance of confusion between the two occupations.

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J.

Only “a door slamming” matches the structures of the previous phrases of “an airplane flying overhead”, and “a phone ringing”.

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B.

2 dashes are equivalent to 2 commas and set off a non-essential clause. (See p76, Meltzer.)

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F.

“Untold” means not revealed. “Unspeakable” means incapable of being spoken. “Speechless” means “temporarily deprived of speech by strong emotion, physical weakness, exhaustion, etc.”. “Endless” means having no end. The money saved is in the range of thousands of dollars, and thus not having no end.

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C.

Two commas should surround the non-essential clause “an army’s worth”.

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G.

The last sentence provides the detail that the movie maker saved money and that audiences got the same auditory effects.

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C.

When a name or title appears in the middle of a sentence, there are generally two correct options.

  • Two commas, one before and one after the name / title
  • No commas at all

When the title / name in question is essential information, no commas should be used; when it is non-essential information, two commas should be used.

In this case, “molecular biologist” is essential information in making sense of the sentence, therefore no commas should be used. The comma after “University”, however, should be kept.

(See p58, Meltzer)

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J.

A semi-colon should be followed by a sentence, eliminating F. G will result in a run-on sentence; a comma should have been placed before “and” (p39, Meltzer). H is what is called a “comma splice”; “and” should have been placed after the comma (p40, Meltzer).

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C.

Two commas should be placed around the non-essential information.

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H.

The phrase “and their” is redundant.

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C.

A semicolon should be followed by a sentence, eliminating A. “which” should come after a comma. Eliminating B. The clause “a luminescent marine bacteria” is non-essential and should be placed after a comma, eliminating D.

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J.

The tense should match the rest of the paragraph.

 

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A.

A comma should be used to separate the sentence beginning with “once” for the first event, and the sentence for the pursuing event.
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G.

F is wrong because the findings are not in contrary to anything said earlier. “Eventually” indicates the findings of her research.

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A.

No commas should be used when using the phrase “called”.

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J.

“Vicinity” is a short, concise use of scientific language.

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D.

The word “them” cannot be followed by “ones”.

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F.

The subject “virulent strains” is plural, eliminating G, H and J.

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D.

“Disease-spreading” repeats the same information in the later portion of the sentence. D is most concise.

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G.

“Her” should be used after the verb “enable”.

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B.

The information should be added as it specifies how Bassler’s research help humans.

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G.

Only the routes of the subway system need to be mapped.

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D.

Reliance of early maps on a geographically accurate scale is NOT a result of the need for mapping the subway system.

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H.

“Indecipherable” means “illegible”. Of the 4 choices, choice H is clearest in suggesting that the early maps are not legible.

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C.

How many miles the London Underway covers today has little to do with the failure of early maps.

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G.

The word “more” at the beginning of the sentence suggests that a comparison is being made here. Thus “than” should be used.

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C.

A comma instead of a semicolon should be used after the clause. A semicolon separates sentences, not fragments.

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J.

“And” is concise and should be used to separate multiple objectives.

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A.

The portion before the comma is not supposed to be a sentence, therefore B, C and D are wrong.

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F.

Only F indicates that Beck’s map used no references to any city streets and therefore the simplest.

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B.

“Subway ridership” is a number and therefore should be “increased”.

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G.

The subject who were “willing to try anything” could only be “the board”, not “copies”.

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B.

Sentence 5 explains why the board initially resisted Beck’s map.

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H.

“Its” is possessive, meaning “the map’s”.

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C.

The underlined portion is the subject of the sentence. Therefore no comma should be used.

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J.

What “this” refers to is not clear. J makes it clear that it is Beck’s innovative method that has been modelled around the world.

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B.

This sentence explains the rationale of Beck’s innovative method of mapping.

 



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ahaan

question 27 – the answer is A, since the clause is non-essential


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